Sansom NEWSLETTER:
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This is an open web page for people who are interested genealogy and history for the Sansom Name. If you have any stories about a Sansom, or want to communicate with a Toler please Email vern@armory.com  I will add your e-mail or snail mail stories to this page so others can benefit from your research or contact you concerning your research. please try to include your source, especially if something has a copyright.


There is an interesting story about a Sansom, in early Texas History. The Book

Subject:       Sansom info update
   Date:        Sun, 27 Dec 1998 21:51:48 -0600
   From:       "Larry & Kathryn Priest" <lwpriest@gower.net>
     :
     Recently I have come across some additional info on Captain John William Sansom
born Feb 5, 1834 died Jun 18, 1920.  I thought I would pass these along incase you
did not have them.  Happy New Year, Larry
Larry and Kathryn Priest in north east Texas
lwpriest@gower.net
Home page of Larry and Kathryn McAda Priest
http://www.familytreemaker.com/users/p/r/i/Larry-W-Priest/index.html

"Life is mostly attitude and timing." a quote of Jerry Jeff Walker
Records of John W. Sansom, in possession of James A. Sansom, Buerna, Texas.
written in bible margin  of Bible.
Married Helen Victoria Patton, d/o Samuel Boyd Patton and his wife, Elizabeth
Dease Patton.  Had one daughter, Victoria Mary Elizabeth John Sansom.

BIBLE RECORD OF JOHN WILLIAM SANSOM
"I, John William Sansom, take this chence and in this our family Bible of John W.
Sansom and Helen V. Sansom, to state in writing what we now know about the origin
of our family and births, beginning next page to this.
William Greenbury Sansom and Mary Short Sansom are the parents of myself (John
William) -Mary Ann-Dicy Ann-James Joseph Nathaniel-Henry Lenard-Delphia
Ann-Francis Marion-Robert Greenbury-Thomas Jefferson-Larkin Theodore George-and
Ann Kaziah.
The Sansoms of our family are three brothers namely: William Cager, Robert and
James, all of whom were by birth and raising English and emigrated to America in
Colonial days and landed first in what was later and now the state of North
Carolina.
I am a descendant of William Cager Sansom but don't know who he married, nor but
little more of the other two brothers.  My great grandfather William Cager Sansom
and his wife my great grandmother was blessed with sons and daughters, some of
whom was William, my grandfather -(Uncles) Robert and James, named for himself and
two brothers, Sally and Polly were daughters.
My grandfather married Delphy Clay in the State of Virginia about the year A.D.
1804. (Delphia Clay and Henry Clay was by blood cousins) and with a young family
moved to the state of Georgia about 1810, and to the Sate of Alabama about 1814 at
which place and state, Dallas County, married my mother Mary
Short on May 1st, 1833 moved to the Republic of Texas in the winter of 1838-39.
My father fought with the Indian Wars of Texas from 1839 to 1874 off and on, the
U.S. and Mexican War 1846-47, Civil War 1861-65.  His wife my mother caring for
their family and bravely standing by him all she could in all these years now
being 53, she died on June 12, 1888 and God called her to sleep in him.  She now
is at the Uvalde Cemetery.  Father was called later August 15, 1903 and is now
sleeping by my mother, God Bless Them.
John Short, my mother's father emigrated from Germany to America landing in
Georgia about A.D. 1773.  He was in the Indian and other wars with General Jackson
and was a warm personal friend of Jackson.  He was a natural genious in wood, iron
and farming.  He was a blacksmith and made the tools that he worked in wood.  Such
was a blacksmith and made the tools that he worked in wood. Such tools as Club
Axe-Broad Axe-Augers-bits-braces and many other items.  He was a great farmer, his
father taught him the latter.  He died Nov. 1843 and was buried by his good wife
(grandmother) in Fayette Co. Texas in the family cemetery.  His wife Dicy Stinson
(my grandmother) died in 1846.  She was Irish of American birth.  She had an only
brother Burrel Stinson.  I saw him when I was a little boy in Alabama, when on our
way to Texas Grandfather Short was with us at the time and stopped at Uncle
Burrel's.  Grandfather bore our
expenses to Texas.  He was a soldier of Houston in the Texas Mexican War of 1836,
was not in the Battle of San Jacinto but in the same army on the Brazos River,
defending a point there when Houston fought and whipped Sant Anna and his Army at
San Jacinto.   Grandfather and mother raised a family of boys and girls, namely in
rotation, Nancy-Mary-Amanda-Thomas-Francis-Burrel-Alfonson, all of which raised
families except Jack-Burrel- and Francis.
My sister Mary Ann married George W. Saunders a Mexican or now Kentuckyan they
have sons and daughters.  Dicy Ann married Dr. Francis M. Martin a Kentuckyan they
have two sons.  Robert Greenbury married Miss Lue Toler a Texas lady they have
sons and daughters. Thomas Jefferson Sansom married Miss Hanks of Missourie, Dr.
Hanks daughter, they have sons and daughters.  Ann Kezziah Sansom married John J.
Davies a Texas man they have sons and daughters. My other brothers and sisters
never married.
I will further state concerning grandmother Sansom family.  Nicholas Morgan
married Aunt Clay in Morgan Co., Georgia.  Thomas Barner of same county married
Aunt Clay.  William Sansom married grandmother Delphia Clay in Virginia. (Jerry
Mosely of Dallas Co., Ala. married Aunt Clay). Greenbury Clay and Maston Clay was
brothers of the afore named Clay women and lived in Jasper and Morgan
Counties.  I think said County Jasper is in Georgia and in Alabama but I am not
certain as to which and which state they belong.  My father William Greenbury
Sansom had sisters.  Aunt Sally married one Johnson they had two daughters. Bettie
married one Lee. Delphia one Glover.  Aunt Polly married James Goodwin they had
sons Jerry, Maston, Fletcher, John and daughter Mary Ann.  Aunt Mahaly
married Elisha Attaway they had sons William-James Nathaniel and daughters Priss
and Kitty.  Ann (Aunt?) Kitty married Baldwin Evans (sp. Evors) they had sons and
daughters.  Mary Ann married Tom Stacy (Stay) and Delphia married Francis Martin
both in Arkansas State Post Office.   Aunt Emily married Joshua Evers they had
sons and daughters. Marshia married Ephian Jones. Maranda Bicham. Randall Evers
don't know who he married they live in Kacy and Maridian County Texas.  Aunt Jane
married Jerramier Goodwin they have a son John and daughter Safrana. She married
William Mosely in Louisiana.  Uncle Nathaniel Sansom married they had six
daughters.  Mary Ann married James Attaway in Caddo Parrish Louisiana.  Uncle Him
Sansom married and had sons and daughters they
live in Buny Co. Texas.
I will name a little about my mother (Mary Short) family.  Aunt Nancy Short
married John Pearson and had a daughter Matilda that married Roe Irwin and later
Lindsey in Washington Co., Texas they have sons and daughters. Aunt Amanda Short
married Floyd Mosely in Alabama they have sons and daughters. Aunt Fannie Short
married Henry Smith they have sons and daughters that live in
Counties Bexar, Kendall and Comal Texas.  Aunt Elizabeth Short married three times
(Wells) Danalson children 2nd Mushpair they had 2 daughters 3rd Sargent no
children all in Washington Co., Texas. Uncle John Short, no family died in 1840
Washington Co., Texas. Uncle William married, had sons and daughters. Uncle Thomas
Short married and had sons and daughters.  He fought from Texas the Indian and
Mexican War and for the Union of the States against Sucession 1861-1865.  Uncle
Alphonson Michael Short married and had sons and daughters. He fought for the
Southern Confederacy in 1861-1865 and on [died] July 4, 1904 at the Confederate
Austin Texas.
I will now give a bit of my wifes family account as it has been opened to me.
Samuel Boyd Patton was born in the State of South Carolina about August 15,1784.
He died March 19, 1869 at Curry Creek, Kendall County, Texas and is buried there
under an live oak tree of his own.  He requested to be buried there Judge Patton
as he was called when I first knew him in 1851 was a fine looking man, he wore a
suit and had fine curly white hair, his hair was white from age. When young he was
a blond.  He was not educated at a school from home but by his mother at her knee.
She put him to teaching school at the age of 16 years then at 18 years put him to
writing in the county clerks office where he remained for several years and while
there married his first wife.  I don't know what her name was but they had born
them 4 sons and 4 daughters in that time of life he joined a call of volunteers to
protect the country against hostile Indians there, to defend New Orleans against
British encrochment he was a Captain in said service, after the British war her
returned home and was elected to the Legislature of Alabama the second time when
he lost his good wife by her death in about the year 1833 and was buried in said
state. Five years later he married Elizabeth Dease in Alabama and soon after moved
to Texas.  His brother (Gordon) Dease going with them, both Judge Patton and Uncle
(Gordon) Dease was in the Army of the Republic of Texas.
Judge Patton at some time was made Land Commissioner.  Father Patton (as I want to
call him) and his wife (mother Dease) was blessed with sons and a daughter. She
and 2 of her children was taken by Cholera in 1849 and all three are buried at a
point some 3 or 5 miles East of Vicksburg, Miss.  Father himself had Cholera also
some Negroe slaves that died there.  At said unlucky place he and family was
caught in a hurricane when there little son was killed by a fallen tree and where
a son-in-law (----) that married Rose Ann, a daughter of the first wife, helped
himself to 1000 dollars of gold while Judge Patton and family was sick and dying.
Father's first family of children was Washington-James-Pickens Thomas-Rose
Ann-Feckie and Matilda.  His second family Benjamin Franklin Patton, Charles
Alexander Patton and Helen Victoria Patten. Benn married Miss Augusta Long that
was born in German and brought to America (in Texas) when a little girl, they have
sons and daughters.  Charles married and they have 5 sons.  Helen Victoria their
baby married John William Sansom. We have one daughter but no son, her name is
Victoria Mary Elizabeth John Sansom which is from her mother-father-and two
grandmothers."
(This bible record can only be used as a guideline to follow genealogical research
of these families and back up by original court records can establish some
information contained within is faulty memory, and some facts can be substantiated
by this record, written by John William Sansom in 1904 at the age
of 70.  One example is the marriage of William Sansom md. Delphia Clay in
Virginia, in 1804.  This marriage is recorded in the original marriages of Greene
Co., Ga. and occured 27 June 1806).
________________________________________________________________________________-
>From "Texas - The Country and Its Men", by L. E. Daniell, Vol., page 618:
 JOHN W. SANSOM,  San Antonio,  Few men ia all Texas have a more interesting,
varied or exciting history than has Captain John W. Sansom of San Antonio, long a
member of the Federal Army and well known as a Ranger, Captian and Indian Fighter.
On many an occasion he has displayed great valor and bravery in the face of
danger, and he is well entitled to the rest he is now enjoying after an active
military business career.  He was born in Dallas County, Alabama, February 5,
1834, and when only 4 years of age was brought to Texas by his parents, William
Greenbury and Mary (Short] Sansom.  His parental grandfather , Col. William
Sansom, was also a noted soldier and frontiersman, who was born in North Carolina
and was with Gen. Jackson in the war against the British in 1812.  He was also
under the same intrepid commander in the battles with the Indians in Florida,
being stationed far a long time in Pensacola.  He married in Virginia to Miss
Delpha Clay, a relative of the family to which Henry Clay belonged.  They
established a home in Georgia, where most of the children were born, and in 1820
they removed to Dallas County, Alabama, where both Colonel William Sansom and his
wife passed away.
 William Greenbury Sansom  was born in Georgia, June 3, 1811, and in 1820
accompanied his parents on the removal to Dallas County, Alabama, where the
Sansoms lived for several years.  In that state W. G. Sansom was married in 1832
to Miss Mary Short, a daughter of Major John short, who was likewise a famous
character in the South, particularly in the early history of Texas.  He came from
Alabama to Texas in 1836, while it was still part of Mexico and was one of Gen.
Houston's soldiers in the war of Texas independence, participating in the victory
of San Jacinto, subsequent to which he did a valiant service with the Rangers in
protecting the early settlers on the frontier from the Indians.  .......[He also
served with Jackson at the battle of New Orleans.]
 Following their marriage William G. and Mary [Short] Sansom remained in Alabama
untill the winter of 1838-9, when they, with their family, came to Texas, two
years after the independence of the State had been won from Mexico.  They located
first in Washington County near the town of Washington, the first capital of the
Republic, and from that county they afterward removed to Lavaca County and
subsequently, in 1850, removed to the Curry Creek settlement in what was then
Comal County.  That county was later subdivided and the two counties of Blanco and
Cater Kendall were set off, the Curry Creek settlement being then in Kendall
County.  The Sansoms lived their for several years, but for a long period and
during the latter part of W. G. Sansom's life were residents of Uvalde County.
William G. Sansom died in 1904 at the very venerable age of 93 years.  .........
The Sansoms were loyal defenders of the Union during the period of the Civil War,
and James Joseph Sansom, a brother of our subject, was killed while acting as a
member of the Federal Army.
 ............ He was reared to farming and stock raising, but soon after the
removal of the family to Curry Creek in what is now Kendall County, he entered
upon the active public life which kept him from many subsequent years of almost
constant warfare and in addition to his military service he acted as the first
Sheriff of Kendall county after its separation from Comal County."
>From "Early Settlers and Indian Fighter of Southwest Texas" by A. J. Sowell,
copyright 1900, Texana 976.4 SOW 1986 State House Press, page 699:
"..........  In October, 1868, the Indians made a raid on Curry's Creek, first
showing themselves at Mr. Ammond's, on the Guadalupe River, ten miles from
Nowlin's ranch, killing some stock and carrying off others.  This was about the
28th of October.  On the same night a runner was sent to the doctor's
neighborhood, informing the people there that Indians were in the country.  On the
following day a company of rangers, commanded by Captain John W. Sansom, hunted
all day for the Indians, and in the evening found where they had crosssed Curry's
Creek.  The people were then notified that the Indians were in their settlement,
and guards were put out........     In 1870 Dr. Nowlin was appointed surgeon to a
company of rangers commanded by Capt. Jown W. Sansom and stationed at Camp Verde.
In the spring of 1871 the company was ordered to Fort Griffin, on the Clear Fork
of the Brazos, and soon after arriving there went on a long scout to the head of
the Big Wichita River.  ......"

Note:  also see The Battle of the Nueces, August 10, 1862 in "Southwest Historical
Quarterly", Vol. 66, page 31;  also in "The Frontier Times", Bandera, Texas, 1943,
pp. 295-298: also in "Southwest Historical Quarterly" Vol. 47, page 165 are notes
on the  "Memoirs of Captian J. W. Sansom",dedicated to his daughter, Mrs.
Elizabeth Sansom Edwards, revised by Ida Schweppe, 325 San Pedro Avenue, San
Antonio and in the possession of Col. M. L. Crimmins, 312 Geneseo Rd., San Antonio
2, Texas along with more detailed notes of his activities.

TEXAS RANGER (PRE-CIVIL WAR) MILITARY ROLLS, 1846-1861,
          This subseries consists of approximately 299 muster rolls and payrolls,
for approximately 81 commanding officers.  Many of the rolls are in duplicate,
triplicate, or even quadruplicate.  They are arranged alphabetically by captain.
The series combines Rangers, Mounted Volunteers, and Minute Men, as the
terminology is interchangeable for the decade and a half before the Civil War.
The county is included on the item inventory whenever it is known; a
cross-reference follows.  Many of the payrolls do not indicate the name of the
captain, and are therefore listed under the name of the lieutenant or sergeant.
Information available on these rolls, which are usually pre-printed forms,
include:  name, rank, age; when, where, by whom, and for what period joined for
duty and enrolled; number of miles to place of rendezvous and from place of
discharge home; valuation in dollars of horses, horse equipment, guns, and
pistols; and remarks.  Most, but not all, of the rolls have apparently been
indexed in the search room card file labelled "Ranger Rolls."  Some of the "Texas
Mounted Volunteer" companies are indexed as "Minute Man," a card index which
includes Republic Minute Men as well.
     Muster rolls for Captains Tobin, A. C. Hill, Littleton, and Harrison
(1859-1861) were transferred on February 27, 1934.
                 Texas Rangers (Pre-Civil War), 1846-1861: Captian Sansom, John W.
Unit- Texas Mounted Rangers/Volunteers
          (Middle Town, Comal County, for protection of upper Blanco's, Curey's,
upper Guadalupe and Pedernales settlements)
                                   April 19, 1856; April 19, 1856;  April 16-July
16, 1856 (payroll)
                                   April 16-July 16, 1856 (payroll) Box 401-725,
Folder 29
 


There is an interesting story about a Sansom, in early TexasHistory. The Book

Subject:
        Sansom info update
   Date:
        Sun, 27 Dec 1998 21:51:48 -0600
   From:        "Larry & Kathryn Priest" <lwpriest@gower.net>
     :
     Recently I have come across some additional info on Captain John William Sansom
born Feb 5, 1834 died Jun 18, 1920.  I thought I would pass these along incase you
did not have them.  Happy New Year, Larry
Larry and Kathryn Priest in north east Texas
lwpriest@gower.net
Home page of Larry and Kathryn McAda Priest
http://www.familytreemaker.com/users/p/r/i/Larry-W-Priest/index.html

"Life is mostly attitude and timing." a quote of Jerry Jeff Walker
 
 

Records of John W. Sansom, in possession of James A. Sansom, Buerna, Texas.
written in bible margin  of Bible.
Married Helen Victoria Patton, d/o Samuel Boyd Patton and his wife, Elizabeth
Dease Patton.  Had one daughter, Victoria Mary Elizabeth John Sansom.

BIBLE RECORD OF JOHN WILLIAM SANSOM
"I, John William Sansom, take this chence and in this our family Bible of John W.
Sansom and Helen V. Sansom, to state in writing what we now know about the origin
of our family and births, beginning next page to this.
William Greenbury Sansom and Mary Short Sansom are the parents of myself (John
William) -Mary Ann-Dicy Ann-James Joseph Nathaniel-Henry Lenard-Delphia
Ann-Francis Marion-Robert Greenbury-Thomas Jefferson-Larkin Theodore George-and
Ann Kaziah.
The Sansoms of our family are three brothers namely: William Cager, Robert and
James, all of whom were by birth and raising English and emigrated to America in
Colonial days and landed first in what was later and now the state of North
Carolina.
I am a descendant of William Cager Sansom but don't know who he married, nor but
little more of the other two brothers.  My great grandfather William Cager Sansom
and his wife my great grandmother was blessed with sons and daughters, some of
whom was William, my grandfather -(Uncles) Robert and James, named for himself and
two brothers, Sally and Polly were daughters.
My grandfather married Delphy Clay in the State of Virginia about the year A.D.
1804. (Delphia Clay and Henry Clay was by blood cousins) and with a young family
moved to the state of Georgia about 1810, and to the Sate of Alabama about 1814 at
which place and state, Dallas County, married my mother Mary
Short on May 1st, 1833 moved to the Republic of Texas in the winter of 1838-39.
My father fought with the Indian Wars of Texas from 1839 to 1874 off and on, the
U.S. and Mexican War 1846-47, Civil War 1861-65.  His wife my mother caring for
their family and bravely standing by him all she could in all these years now
being 53, she died on June 12, 1888 and God called her to sleep in him.  She now
is at the Uvalde Cemetery.  Father was called later August 15, 1903 and is now
sleeping by my mother, God Bless Them.
John Short, my mother's father emigrated from Germany to America landing in
Georgia about A.D. 1773.  He was in the Indian and other wars with General Jackson
and was a warm personal friend of Jackson.  He was a natural genious in wood, iron
and farming.  He was a blacksmith and made the tools that he worked in wood.  Such
was a blacksmith and made the tools that he worked in wood. Such tools as Club
Axe-Broad Axe-Augers-bits-braces and many other items.  He was a great farmer, his
father taught him the latter.  He died Nov. 1843 and was buried by his good wife
(grandmother) in Fayette Co. Texas in the family cemetery.  His wife Dicy Stinson
(my grandmother) died in 1846.  She was Irish of American birth.  She had an only
brother Burrel Stinson.  I saw him when I was a little boy in Alabama, when on our
way to Texas Grandfather Short was with us at the time and stopped at Uncle
Burrel's.  Grandfather bore our
expenses to Texas.  He was a soldier of Houston in the Texas Mexican War of 1836,
was not in the Battle of San Jacinto but in the same army on the Brazos River,
defending a point there when Houston fought and whipped Sant Anna and his Army at
San Jacinto.   Grandfather and mother raised a family of boys and girls, namely in
rotation, Nancy-Mary-Amanda-Thomas-Francis-Burrel-Alfonson, all of which raised
families except Jack-Burrel- and Francis.
My sister Mary Ann married George W. Saunders a Mexican or now Kentuckyan they
have sons and daughters.  Dicy Ann married Dr. Francis M. Martin a Kentuckyan they
have two sons.  Robert Greenbury married Miss Lue Toler a Texas lady they have
sons and daughters. Thomas Jefferson Sansom married Miss Hanks of Missourie, Dr.
Hanks daughter, they have sons and daughters.  Ann Kezziah Sansom married John J.
Davies a Texas man they have sons and daughters. My other brothers and sisters
never married.
I will further state concerning grandmother Sansom family.  Nicholas Morgan
married Aunt Clay in Morgan Co., Georgia.  Thomas Barner of same county married
Aunt Clay.  William Sansom married grandmother Delphia Clay in Virginia. (Jerry
Mosely of Dallas Co., Ala. married Aunt Clay). Greenbury Clay and Maston Clay was
brothers of the afore named Clay women and lived in Jasper and Morgan
Counties.  I think said County Jasper is in Georgia and in Alabama but I am not
certain as to which and which state they belong.  My father William Greenbury
Sansom had sisters.  Aunt Sally married one Johnson they had two daughters. Bettie
married one Lee. Delphia one Glover.  Aunt Polly married James Goodwin they had
sons Jerry, Maston, Fletcher, John and daughter Mary Ann.  Aunt Mahaly
married Elisha Attaway they had sons William-James Nathaniel and daughters Priss
and Kitty.  Ann (Aunt?) Kitty married Baldwin Evans (sp. Evors) they had sons and
daughters.  Mary Ann married Tom Stacy (Stay) and Delphia married Francis Martin
both in Arkansas State Post Office.   Aunt Emily married Joshua Evers they had
sons and daughters. Marshia married Ephian Jones. Maranda Bicham. Randall Evers
don't know who he married they live in Kacy and Maridian County Texas.  Aunt Jane
married Jerramier Goodwin they have a son John and daughter Safrana. She married
William Mosely in Louisiana.  Uncle Nathaniel Sansom married they had six
daughters.  Mary Ann married James Attaway in Caddo Parrish Louisiana.  Uncle Him
Sansom married and had sons and daughters they
live in Buny Co. Texas.
I will name a little about my mother (Mary Short) family.  Aunt Nancy Short
married John Pearson and had a daughter Matilda that married Roe Irwin and later
Lindsey in Washington Co., Texas they have sons and daughters. Aunt Amanda Short
married Floyd Mosely in Alabama they have sons and daughters. Aunt Fannie Short
married Henry Smith they have sons and daughters that live in
Counties Bexar, Kendall and Comal Texas.  Aunt Elizabeth Short married three times
(Wells) Danalson children 2nd Mushpair they had 2 daughters 3rd Sargent no
children all in Washington Co., Texas. Uncle John Short, no family died in 1840
Washington Co., Texas. Uncle William married, had sons and daughters. Uncle Thomas
Short married and had sons and daughters.  He fought from Texas the Indian and
Mexican War and for the Union of the States against Sucession 1861-1865.  Uncle
Alphonson Michael Short married and had sons and daughters. He fought for the
Southern Confederacy in 1861-1865 and on [died] July 4, 1904 at the Confederate
Austin Texas.
I will now give a bit of my wifes family account as it has been opened to me.
Samuel Boyd Patton was born in the State of South Carolina about August 15,1784.
He died March 19, 1869 at Curry Creek, Kendall County, Texas and is buried there
under an live oak tree of his own.  He requested to be buried there Judge Patton
as he was called when I first knew him in 1851 was a fine looking man, he wore a
suit and had fine curly white hair, his hair was white from age. When young he was
a blond.  He was not educated at a school from home but by his mother at her knee.
She put him to teaching school at the age of 16 years then at 18 years put him to
writing in the county clerks office where he remained for several years and while
there married his first wife.  I don't know what her name was but they had born
them 4 sons and 4 daughters in that time of life he joined a call of volunteers to
protect the country against hostile Indians there, to defend New Orleans against
British encrochment he was a Captain in said service, after the British war her
returned home and was elected to the Legislature of Alabama the second time when
he lost his good wife by her death in about the year 1833 and was buried in said
state. Five years later he married Elizabeth Dease in Alabama and soon after moved
to Texas.  His brother (Gordon) Dease going with them, both Judge Patton and Uncle
(Gordon) Dease was in the Army of the Republic of Texas.
Judge Patton at some time was made Land Commissioner.  Father Patton (as I want to
call him) and his wife (mother Dease) was blessed with sons and a daughter. She
and 2 of her children was taken by Cholera in 1849 and all three are buried at a
point some 3 or 5 miles East of Vicksburg, Miss.  Father himself had Cholera also
some Negroe slaves that died there.  At said unlucky place he and family was
caught in a hurricane when there little son was killed by a fallen tree and where
a son-in-law (----) that married Rose Ann, a daughter of the first wife, helped
himself to 1000 dollars of gold while Judge Patton and family was sick and dying.
Father's first family of children was Washington-James-Pickens Thomas-Rose
Ann-Feckie and Matilda.  His second family Benjamin Franklin Patton, Charles
Alexander Patton and Helen Victoria Patten. Benn married Miss Augusta Long that
was born in German and brought to America (in Texas) when a little girl, they have
sons and daughters.  Charles married and they have 5 sons.  Helen Victoria their
baby married John William Sansom. We have one daughter but no son, her name is
Victoria Mary Elizabeth John Sansom which is from her mother-father-and two
grandmothers."
(This bible record can only be used as a guideline to follow genealogical research
of these families and back up by original court records can establish some
information contained within is faulty memory, and some facts can be substantiated
by this record, written by John William Sansom in 1904 at the age
of 70.  One example is the marriage of William Sansom md. Delphia Clay in
Virginia, in 1804.  This marriage is recorded in the original marriages of Greene
Co., Ga. and occured 27 June 1806).
________________________________________________________________________________-
>From "Texas - The Country and Its Men", by L. E. Daniell, Vol., page 618:
 JOHN W. SANSOM,  San Antonio,  Few men ia all Texas have a more interesting,
varied or exciting history than has Captain John W. Sansom of San Antonio, long a
member of the Federal Army and well known as a Ranger, Captian and Indian Fighter.
On many an occasion he has displayed great valor and bravery in the face of
danger, and he is well entitled to the rest he is now enjoying after an active
military business career.  He was born in Dallas County, Alabama, February 5,
1834, and when only 4 years of age was brought to Texas by his parents, William
Greenbury and Mary (Short] Sansom.  His parental grandfather , Col. William
Sansom, was also a noted soldier and frontiersman, who was born in North Carolina
and was with Gen. Jackson in the war against the British in 1812.  He was also
under the same intrepid commander in the battles with the Indians in Florida,
being stationed far a long time in Pensacola.  He married in Virginia to Miss
Delpha Clay, a relative of the family to which Henry Clay belonged.  They
established a home in Georgia, where most of the children were born, and in 1820
they removed to Dallas County, Alabama, where both Colonel William Sansom and his
wife passed away.
 William Greenbury Sansom  was born in Georgia, June 3, 1811, and in 1820
accompanied his parents on the removal to Dallas County, Alabama, where the
Sansoms lived for several years.  In that state W. G. Sansom was married in 1832
to Miss Mary Short, a daughter of Major John short, who was likewise a famous
character in the South, particularly in the early history of Texas.  He came from
Alabama to Texas in 1836, while it was still part of Mexico and was one of Gen.
Houston's soldiers in the war of Texas independence, participating in the victory
of San Jacinto, subsequent to which he did a valiant service with the Rangers in
protecting the early settlers on the frontier from the Indians.  .......[He also
served with Jackson at the battle of New Orleans.]
 Following their marriage William G. and Mary [Short] Sansom remained in Alabama
untill the winter of 1838-9, when they, with their family, came to Texas, two
years after the independence of the State had been won from Mexico.  They located
first in Washington County near the town of Washington, the first capital of the
Republic, and from that county they afterward removed to Lavaca County and
subsequently, in 1850, removed to the Curry Creek settlement in what was then
Comal County.  That county was later subdivided and the two counties of Blanco and
Cater Kendall were set off, the Curry Creek settlement being then in Kendall
County.  The Sansoms lived their for several years, but for a long period and
during the latter part of W. G. Sansom's life were residents of Uvalde County.
William G. Sansom died in 1904 at the very venerable age of 93 years.  .........
The Sansoms were loyal defenders of the Union during the period of the Civil War,
and James Joseph Sansom, a brother of our subject, was killed while acting as a
member of the Federal Army.
 ............ He was reared to farming and stock raising, but soon after the
removal of the family to Curry Creek in what is now Kendall County, he entered
upon the active public life which kept him from many subsequent years of almost
constant warfare and in addition to his military service he acted as the first
Sheriff of Kendall county after its separation from Comal County."
>From "Early Settlers and Indian Fighter of Southwest Texas" by A. J. Sowell,
copyright 1900, Texana 976.4 SOW 1986 State House Press, page 699:
"..........  In October, 1868, the Indians made a raid on Curry's Creek, first
showing themselves at Mr. Ammond's, on the Guadalupe River, ten miles from
Nowlin's ranch, killing some stock and carrying off others.  This was about the
28th of October.  On the same night a runner was sent to the doctor's
neighborhood, informing the people there that Indians were in the country.  On the
following day a company of rangers, commanded by Captain John W. Sansom, hunted
all day for the Indians, and in the evening found where they had crosssed Curry's
Creek.  The people were then notified that the Indians were in their settlement,
and guards were put out........     In 1870 Dr. Nowlin was appointed surgeon to a
company of rangers commanded by Capt. Jown W. Sansom and stationed at Camp Verde.
In the spring of 1871 the company was ordered to Fort Griffin, on the Clear Fork
of the Brazos, and soon after arriving there went on a long scout to the head of
the Big Wichita River.  ......"

Note:  also see The Battle of the Nueces, August 10, 1862 in "Southwest Historical
Quarterly", Vol. 66, page 31;  also in "The Frontier Times", Bandera, Texas, 1943,
pp. 295-298: also in "Southwest Historical Quarterly" Vol. 47, page 165 are notes
on the  "Memoirs of Captian J. W. Sansom",dedicated to his daughter, Mrs.
Elizabeth Sansom Edwards, revised by Ida Schweppe, 325 San Pedro Avenue, San
Antonio and in the possession of Col. M. L. Crimmins, 312 Geneseo Rd., San Antonio
2, Texas along with more detailed notes of his activities.

TEXAS RANGER (PRE-CIVIL WAR) MILITARY ROLLS, 1846-1861,
          This subseries consists of approximately 299 muster rolls and payrolls,
for approximately 81 commanding officers.  Many of the rolls are in duplicate,
triplicate, or even quadruplicate.  They are arranged alphabetically by captain.
The series combines Rangers, Mounted Volunteers, and Minute Men, as the
terminology is interchangeable for the decade and a half before the Civil War.
The county is included on the item inventory whenever it is known; a
cross-reference follows.  Many of the payrolls do not indicate the name of the
captain, and are therefore listed under the name of the lieutenant or sergeant.
Information available on these rolls, which are usually pre-printed forms,
include:  name, rank, age; when, where, by whom, and for what period joined for
duty and enrolled; number of miles to place of rendezvous and from place of
discharge home; valuation in dollars of horses, horse equipment, guns, and
pistols; and remarks.  Most, but not all, of the rolls have apparently been
indexed in the search room card file labelled "Ranger Rolls."  Some of the "Texas
Mounted Volunteer" companies are indexed as "Minute Man," a card index which
includes Republic Minute Men as well.
     Muster rolls for Captains Tobin, A. C. Hill, Littleton, and Harrison
(1859-1861) were transferred on February 27, 1934.
                 Texas Rangers (Pre-Civil War), 1846-1861: Captian Sansom, John W.
Unit- Texas Mounted Rangers/Volunteers
          (Middle Town, Comal County, for protection of upper Blanco's, Curey's,
upper Guadalupe and Pedernales settlements)
                                   April 19, 1856; April 19, 1856;  April 16-July
16, 1856 (payroll)
                                   April 16-July 16, 1856 (payroll) Box 401-725,
Folder 29
                                   August 31-November 30, 1859 (payroll)
                                   August 31-November 30, 1859 (payroll) Drawer
401-795, Folder 16
_____________________________________________________________________________
FRONTIER FORCES MILITARY ROLLS, 1870-1871,
     This subseries consists of approximately 94 muster rolls and muster/pay
rolls, plus three folders of duplicate rolls, for about 19 captains.  They are
arranged by company (Companies A through P).  The preprinted forms include the
following information:  name, rank, date of entry into service, station, and
remarks; in addition, the muster/payrolls also include valuation of horses, number
of cartridges due the state, by whom and to what time last paid.  The men listed
in these rolls have been included in the search room "Ranger Rolls" card index. In
addition, there are two ledgers.  One, in addition to officers    of the State
Guard and the Reserve Militia, lists officers of the Frontier Forces (on pages
600-607), giving date of commission, name, rank, age, company to which assigned,
date of acceptance, post office address (town and county), and remarks.
Arrangement is chronological.  The other is an index to the Roster of Reserve
Militia, State Guard, and Frontier Forces, letters U through Z only.
     These rolls were transferred on February 21, 1934.
Sansom, John W.          Company C, Texas Rangers/Frontier Forces
   August 25, 1870 (Austin); August 25-October 31, 1870 (Camp Verde, Kerr County)
; August 25-October 31, 1870;  November 1-December 31, 1870; November 1-December
31, 1870; November 1-December 31, 1870; January 1-February 28, 1871; January
1-February 28, 1871; March 1-April 30, 1871 (Ft. Griffin);       March 1-April 30,
1871; May 1-31, 1871; May 1-31, 1871; Box 401-742, Folder 3
________________________________________________________________________
The Uvalde Leader-News, Thursday, March 9, 1978, Uvalde, Texas 78801 Section
B,Page 1
Sansom Remembered by Jane Knapik
 The Sansom school picture that T. H. Johnson recently sent to the Uvalde
Leader-News reminded many Uvaldeans of earlier times in our area. The picture is
reprinted here with many of the students identified as Johnson requested.
 Sansom, later called North Uvalde, was the town that grew up along the tracks
after the Houston, Galveston and San Antonio Railroad came through Uvalde County
in 1882. “A Proud Heritage,” published two years ago, described Sansom during the
years when its business places included three hotels catering to the traveling
public.
 The train was always a focal point for the community. People often used Sunday
afternoon to watch the trains come and go, to see who arrived or departed. Johnson
especially remembers the time in 1909 when he was part of a large crowd gathered
at the depot in Sansom to hear President William H. Taft deliver a speech from his
special car.
 Sansom was named after Captain John W. Sansom, owner of one of the hotels near
the depot. His brother, Robert G. Sansom, was the ancestor of George and Ira
Sansom of Uvalde.
 Oppenheimer Street, generally considered the boundary between early Uvalde and
Sansom, was named for Daniel Oppenheimer. Many former citizens of Sansom still
live on lots bought from him in 1907. He also donated the land for Sansom’s city
park. The Honey Bowl stadium is now located on that site.
 The post office for Sansom, or Sansom City, existed from 1907 to 1921. Sansom was
an incorporated town until 1921. when it became part of the city of Uvalde. The
post office continued under the name of North Uvalde until it was closed in 1973.
 Sansom’s jail is now used for storage at the home of Mrs. Georgia Belle
Getzendaner, 1116 North Getty Street. Her father, G. N. Gibbens, bought the
building about 1912. Through the years, garages were attached to each side of it.
It still has bars on the wIndows and has the original door. Food was handed to
prisoners through two small windows that can be seen on the north side of the
building.
 Originally the old jail had no floor. According to an old story, the lack of
flooring made it possible for some men to release a prisoner when they pushed the
building over on its side. Another story tells of a very strong prisoner who was
able to rock the building back and forth until it turned over and allowed him to
escape.
 Mr. and Mrs. Tex King, who live at 412 West Daniel Street, can show visitors the
remains of a homemade train caboose. It was originally attached to the Uvalde &
Northern train that ran between Sansom and Camp Wood from 1911 to 1941.

Postmaster Arthur Halbert and his wife, Alice Bumey Halbert, owned property along
Front Street, parallel to the railroad.  Cont. on page 3-B [missing]

_______________________________________________________________________________
SANSOM HISTORY [unknown source but think it is from a county history book for
Uvalde Co., TX]

The railroad came through Uvalde County in 1882. Although the railroad signed an
agreement not to build or lay out a town at the Two Mile Water Hole, a town grew
up about two miles west of there. There is a map of this town in the Uvalde County
Clerk’s office dated 1908. This town was named Sansom in honor of Captain John W.
Sansom who was a Ranger and a veteran of the Civil War. Captain Sansom owned a
hotel and several lots north of the depot prior to 1905. Sansom was at one time
incorporated. There were at least two mayors. They were Mel Wood and Tom
Rasington. Some of the citizens who owned a great deal of city property became
unhappy with the city taxes. There was an election and the corporation was
dissolved. Some of the businesses in Sansom included three hotels: the Star Hotel
owned by J. B. King, Miss Vera Omelia's Depot Hotel, and the Red Brick Hotel
operated by J. W. Mason. There was a grocery store and a confectionary in his
hotel also. The building is still standing like a monument to a bygone era. Some
other grocery stores included those owned by Mr. J. A. Dean and son Jack, D. C.
Rodgers, Adams and Johnson, Mel Wood, and Arthur Halbert. Mr. Halbert had a
confectionary along with his grocery store. Then there was the Howerton grocery
which featured homemade candy and carried a supply of coffins in a back room.
Sansom also had a Ranchman’s Mercantile operated by Walter Shirley and Floyd
Hambrick and a Sunset Grain Company owned by J. A. Dean. Mr. Lee Graves and his
father T. J. Graves bought the Sansom Supply from A. R. Biggard in 1915. This
business has survived through the years. Although the location has been changed
from Park Street to Milam Street, it is still owned and operated by the Graves
family. Will Gains was Sansom’s nursery man. He also sold fresh vegetables. He
planted the trees on the courthouse square. Mr. and Mrs. Taylor Shepherd were
taxidermists and among other things made beautiful baskets from the bony armor of
armadillo. Mr. McGlason had a wholesale grocery business. There was also a
merchant’s wholesale with which John Evans and Bob Smith were associated. Mr. W.
A. Ebarb had a hamburger stand and sold his hamburgers for 5 cents. Bolen Wood was
the druggist of that time. Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Halbert took care of the U.S. Mail
service for many years. S. L. Jones provided the community with milk from his
dairy. Mr. W. A. Bostick worked with Allen and W. 0. Victor in   their apiaries.
John and Kirk Lewis carried the mail from Uvalde to the depot for a long time. Joe
Sampier had a blacksmith shop and a meat market. Ed Donald cut the hair of the
Sansomites. John Gallaway and Andy Hale were the carpenters. T. L. Rasington was
the bookkeeper of that day. He also taught bookkeeping. There was a bottling works
with which Mr. Hanna and Mr. Holinsworth were associated. Minnie Coats had a
millinery shop. Mrs. Effie Dean Roberts recalls having a hat made for a special
trip. She went by train, the windows of which had to be open for ventilation. Her
beautiful hat was soiled by the cinders in the train smoke. Sansom also had a
newspaper at one time called SANSOM SMILE. Mrs. Virgil Gray remembers Mr.
Openheimer selling lots in Sansom for $75 each. Some other families living in
San-som were those of John Cummings, Felix Cummings, Will Cummings, Jim Brice, Dan
Flynn, G. H. Allen, Reuben Barber, Albert Barber, J. C. Powell, Z. H. Pannell,
Rufus Marlin, John R. Gallaway, G. W. Tubbs, J. S. Rider, Fred Webb, Bell Rasser
and Aunt Dolly Dean. There was also Bill and May Ray. Pierce Uzzell came to Sansom
about 1912 and began working for the railroad in 1915. At that time there were
several passenger trains each day. They were numbered 101, 102, 9, 10, 7, and 8.
The even numbers went east and the odd numbers west. In addition to these there
were two mixed trains numbered 227 and 228. Front Street, the street near the
depot, was part of the road that went to Barksdale and Rocksprings.
Many salesmen, called drummers, came to Sansom by train and traveled to other
towns by buggy or hack. Most freight came by rail and was carried to its
destination by wagons. This gave employment to many of the men in Sansom. Mrs.
Virgil Gray remembers a dray, drawn by two large gray horses with unusually large
feet, that carried the freight from the depot to Uvalde. At one time this depot
handled accounts for the Missouri Pacific, Southern Pacific, Crystal City-Uvalde
road, and the Northern.
Mr. Uzzell worked for the railroad 43 years and 7 months. Some other agents he
remembers are: B. F. M[?], H. F. Fusselman, W. F. Griffin, ? Watts, a Mr. Little,
Joe Williams, Jerry McCarty. P. A. Johnson was agent for the express in the early
days. Other railroad workers were: Tom [Cal?]laway, E. L. Johnson, D. R. Fitch,
[?] ton Eason, and J. A. Barns. The railroad built a short track of light gauge
steel which started at McKenzie Street and went down Oppenheimer, Park, Minter,
High, and terminated on E. Main about two blocks from the courthouse. There was a
substation near the location of the old Mundine home on Mulberry St.  A streetcar
ran on this track and carried passengers to and from Uvalde. The price was 10
cents. Mrs. Effie Dean Roberts remembers going to church in Sansom, then riding
the streetcar with a boy friend down to Uvalde to attend the Epworth League at the
Methodist Church. It also carried many children to school. When cars became
available to almost every one. The streetcar was discontinued and was parked off
E. Main for a long time. It was eventually sold to Whites Mines to be used in
their business operation. Sansom had a union church house. Everybody contributed
to its building and any denomination could use it for services. Ethel Gallaway
remembers that some of the ministers who preached there were: Dan W. Mathews, John
H. Jackson. J. P. King and F. G. Moses. Br. George Sewall was invited to lead the
singing during the revivals and Effie Hale played the organ. Mrs. Virgil Gray
remembers services in a brush arbor. After some time the Baptists of the community
built a tabernacle, the sides of which could be opened out. They baptized their
converts in the Two Mile Water Hole. When cars became plentiful, people began
going to churches in Uvalde. The tabernacle was then sold to W. C. Carver who used
the lumber in building his house in the south part of Uvalde. Sansom had a school.
Only the first through the fourth grades were taught. Children finishing the
fourth grade went to Uvalde schools. The school was located where the water tower
in North Uvalde now stands. Some of the teachers were: Miss Mary Johns, Miss Hope
Victor (who became Mrs. Tom Witt), Miss Annie Robb, Mrs. Jessie Conner and a Mrs.
Webb. In 1943 this school building was moved to Uvalde and is now located across
the street, south of Jr. High School. It was used as the Vocational Agriculture
Building for some time and is now occupied by the D.E.E.P. program. The young
people of Sansom made their own fun. On Sunday night, when there was no church
service, they would gather in a home and sing. There was a ‘play party” almost
every weekend at someone’s home. During Christmas there would be a party every
night. The boys had a baseball team and played other towns. The team from Vance
seemed to have been a favorite. There were the Two Mile Hole and the Yellow Water
Hole, in the Leona. where boys could learn to swim. The community had homemade ice
cream suppers where the football stadium is now located. That was Sansom’s Park.
Kodaking was a good pastime. Groups of young people would gather and walk to the
bridge. The bridge was the railroad bridge near the Two Mile Water Hole. Mrs.
Effie Roberts remembers a period when the lower floor of the Red Brick Hotel was
converted to a skating rink and that provided amusement for the younger set for a
while.
The names North Uvalde and Sansom were used synonymously on legal documents, such
as land deeds, as far back as 1905. In the early 1920’s Sansom was incorporated
into the City of Uvalde. The name of the post office was changed to North Uvalde
and Sansom ceased to exist.
Submitted by
Mrs. John Gallaway and
Mrs. Alma Barber
[Balance is in Notes for his wife]
 
 
 

"Capt John"    A book about J. W. SAMSOM
by Frankie Davis Glenn--*
< dfglenn Frankie Glenn >

*Capt. John Samson is the Uncle of Frankie Davis Glenn who has written several books on the Frontier of Texas

< dfglenn@gvtc.com >

The Short Newsletter also has much information about Sansom in the Short family story by Jack Short  (permission given by author Jack Short)

William Greenbury Sansom’s Confession
Texas Banner, Huntsville, Texas Oct. 6, 1849
Article entitled:
The First Convict of Huntsville, Texas.
William G. (Greenbury) Sansom, of Fayette county is the first convict in the
State Penitentiary.  He was brought here a few days ago by the Sheriff of
that County, and delivered over to the Superintendent.  He was sentenced we
understand, for three years, and * rainy upon his own confession, the
material potion of which we publish below.  Early in August last, he was
apprehended by the “Fayette County Association,” as belonging to the band of
thieves, robbers, & etc, who have infested that part of the state, and was
placed in the hands of the officers of the law, and lodged in jail.  Just
before the trial, he made the following confession, in the present of
witnesses, upon which confession he was convicted and sentenced.
He. Sansom said, “I do solemnly before God state the truth, the whole truth,
and nothing but the truth.”
“Some time in the year 1847, as near as I can recollect, about July or
August, Wm. Short, Griggs and Crook did drive off out of what is known as
Murcherson’s prairie, a drove of cattle numbering about five or six cows and
calves, and some yearlings, and sold them to one Hewitt, as I afterwards
learned from Wm Short.
After this, the next time I knew of Wm Short, I was in La Grange and
employed in digging a well for John Carter, and going home, I found Wm Short
and Smith at my home, whose name I was told afterwards by Wm Short, was
Ritchie, and that he came from Eastern Texas.
Before Richie started to Eastern Texas, he, Short, told me he was harboring
Dr. Atkins’ Negro boy, named David and a one-eyed Negro boy, name unknown,
who I understood belonged to some man in the lower country of Texas, and Wm
Short and Richie took them to Eastern Texas and sold them.  Wm Short told me
that he also took Mr. Derr’s mare and filly to go off upon.
The next time I saw Griggs, he came to my home, and offered to sell me some
land certificates.  I did not buy, but told him John Murcherson wanted to
buy.  He ask me to go to Murcherson’s with him and I did.  He said he would
give him a trade if they were good, and as he was going to LaGrange, he
would ask some one that knew.  J. S. Mayfield told him they were base
certificates.  Griggs came back to my house and told me these things.  I
then ask Griggs if he would have put them upon me, he said he would have put
them upon any body.
Wm Short told me that Thomas J. Williams purchased two Negro men from one of
the clan, and that afterwards one of the same clan stole them again.  At
another time, being in LaGrange, Wm Short borrowed my mare, and went off and
stayed until about an hour in the night.  I went to his house and upon my
arrival found McLaughlin there-When Short came home he brought horses with
him.  This was in the spring of -(part missing).  Wm Short told me last
spring he wanted to raise $300, and if be could do it, he could make as much
as he wanted. I ask him what he wanted it for; he said he wanted to buy a
set of dies from Bostick.--that he had two sets, one for gold and another
for silver, and that he could employ as good a chemists as ever was to help
him.  He said he had seen the dies.  I don’t know whether Short got them or
not.  At another time, Short told me that Bostick was very mad with him.
Bostick got drunk and took the dies out of his truck and hid them, and
accused Short of stealing them.  Bostick afterwards found them, and came to
Short and told him and made friends.  Wm Short told me that Griggs was one
of the clan, also, McLaughlin.
Thomas Short and Wm Ragin he said were good friends.  Bostick, he said, was
a good hand to leg at law.  Shook- a minister - his business was to sell
fraudulent land certificates; also, he said Agory was a dealer, which
signifies one of the clan.  Alfred O’Bar told me he intended to steal Vere’s
Negro girl Louisa.  Wm Short told me, if I ever told on him or any of the
clan, and they were punished, there were men that would come from the Sabine
to take my life.
I acknowledge to the killing of two of T. J. Williams hogs last winter, and
Wm Short and Thomas Short helped me.  I think they would weight 150 to 160
lbs. each.
(siqned) W .G. sansom
witnessed by J. B. McFarland, H. G. Wood, and James A. Haynie August 23,
1849
******* **** *****************************************************

Wm G. Sansom said in the presence of J. H. Moore and J. B. McFarland, that
small the son-in-law of McLaughlin, purchased a fine double-barrelled shot
gun from a Dutchman living near Round Top, and paid for it in counterfeit
money, (payer) and that Bill Short told him, Sansom, that if he ever
divulged anything on the clan, that death would be his portion; that he
would not live twenty-four hours, and that even woman had been murdered in
Eastern Texas for hunting round and making attempts to divulge, the secret
that he also stole two of J. Murcherson’s --and a mule of Alfred Kerkedel
last spring.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
--------------------
Note from Frankie Davis Glenn, 102 Hughs, Boerne, TX 78006
<dfglenn@gvtc.com>
This story will be in my next book.

Note from Larry Priest, 15839 Cedar Bay Drive, Bullard, TX 75757
Frankie has written "Capt'n John, a Story of a Texas Ranger" by Nortex
Press, Sunbelt Media, Inc., Austin, TX
She has it available for sale from her home address along with "The Boy
Captives" by Clinton L. Smith.  This is the story of the capture of  young
Clinton L. Smith and Jeff D. Smith by Indians on the frontier of Texas.
These boys were cousins of John William Sansom.  The book is the
autobiographical story of the boys' life with Indians while they roamed the
western United States.  It was written with the assistance of J. Marvin
Hunter in 1927.  This is the eighth printing by Anchor Publishing Co., 221
N. Main, San Angelo, TX 76903   915-653-9051   ISBN 0-943639-24-9  I highly
recommend this book.  I have never read anything that gave me a better
picture of life with the Indians in the late 1800's.  This was real life
first hand!

(The above information was attained by "Frankie Davis Glenn" who has researched and authored several books on Texas History.)

FRONTIER TIMES MUSEUM in Bandera, Texas. The museum is a historical tribute to the work of J. Marvin Hunter, Sr  who developed the international famous museum, dedicated to early Texas stories and history.  Mr. Hunter published the book "The Boy Captives" with the cooperation of the Smith Brothers.  Decedents of the Smith family published later editions and copies can be obtained from them.  1-800-523-4277  (915-446-2086)  HC 87 Box 62A. Junction, TX 76849.
Vern Toler donated a copy of the original book to the museum.

(Copied from history of Texas book page 879 by vern toler)

SANSOM, JOHN WILLIAM (1834-1920) John W. Sandom, frontier militia officer and Unionist leader, was born in Dallas County, Alabama, on February 5, 1834, one of eleven children of William Greenbury Sansom and Mary ("Polly") Short. After his parents moved to the Republic of ?Texas in the winter of 1838-39, John Sansom lived in succession, in Washington, Lavaaca, Comal (Later Kendall), Uvalde, and Bexar counties until his death in 1920. The Sansom family moved to Curry Creek in 1850, and John Sansom grew to manhood at Curry's Creek Settlement, in the area of present Kendall County, where his family engaged in farming and ranching. In 1855 he became a private in the local company of Texas Rangers, thus beginning nearly thirty years of public service. That year he too part in the Callahan expedition.  By 1856 he was captian. During the Civil Way Sansom, from a staunch Unionist family, was invited to accept a position of leadership in the Union Loyal League, a militia organized to protect parts of Kendall, Gillespie, and Kerr counties from Indian raids and Confederate actions, After the battle of Nueces on August 10, 1862, of which Sansom wrote the authoritative account, Battle of Nueces River in Kinney County, Tex. Aug. 10, 1862 (Published in 1905) the league was forced underground, and Sansom, along with many other Texas Unionist like Andrew J. Hamilton and Edmund J. Davis, Went to New Orelans after that city was taken by Union forces. Sansom joined the first Texas Cavalry (Union) and took part in the Rio Grand Campaign. After the war Sansom continued his service as a captain and later major of ranger troops in the Hill Country. One episode during this time was the capture by the Indians of Sansom's young cousins Clint and Jeff Smith.  In 1882 Sansom was invited by New Mexico to help organize the territorial troops of that state.  In 1883 he retired to ranch holdings he had acquired earlier in the Uvade County, Texas. In 1904 he and his family retired completely from public and business life moved to a home at 1102 North Flores Street in San Antonio. Sansom married Helen Victoria Patton in Blanco County in 1860. They had one child, a daughter named Elizabeth. Preceded in death by his wife. Sansom died on June 19, 1920, in San Antonio and was buried in Mission Burial Park, near San Jose Mission, in San Antonio.

BIBLIOGRAPHY:  Bob Bennett, Kerr County, Texas, 1856-1956  (San Antonio: Naylor, 1956: rev. by Clara Watkins: Kerr County, Texas, 1856-1976, Kerrville, Texas: Hill Country Preservation Society, 1975) Guido E. Ransleben, A Hundred Years of Comfort in Texas ( San Antonio: Naylor, 1954: rev. ed. 1974) A twentieth Century History of Southwest Texas ( 2, vol. Chicago: Lewis, 1907) Vertical Files, Barker Texas History Center, University of Texas at Austin.

Subject:              SANSOM RESEARCH
        Date:              Mon, 31 May 1999 16:56:54 -0300
       From:              David Sansom <sansomd@sansom.nb.ca>
 Organization:              Sansom Equipment Ltd
     MY NAME IS DAVID SANSOM AND I'M ATTEMPTING TO DO SOME RESEARCH ON OUR HISTORY IN ATLANTIC CANADA.  I AM LOCATED IN FREDERICTON, NEW BRUNSWICK, AND AS NEAR AS I CAN TELL OUR EARLIEST ANCESTORS ARRIVED FROM CARDIGAN, WALES.  THEY ARRIVED IN SAINT JOHN, NEW BRUNSWICK, ARRIVING ON THE "ALBION" IN THE EARLY TO MID 1800'S.  THE SETTLED IN A RURAL AREA OF NEW BRUNSWICK WHICH THEY NAMED CARDIGAN (AFTER THEIR HOMELAND).  CARDIGAN IS ABOUT A ONE-HALF HOURS DRIVE FROM FREDERICTON, AND MANY OF TODAYS SANSOMS LIVE WITHIN AN AREA BOUNDED BY FREDERICTON AND STANLEY (APPROXIMATELY 40 MILES).IF ANYONE HAS ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON OUR PAST I WOULD LOOK FORWARD TO HEARING BACK FROM THEM.
 
 
 

Glen E. Lich

Vern Toler's branch goes back to Wm; Greenburay Sansom 4 June 1780 in N. Carolina & Robert Sansom 1750 in Ireland.

*** Need more stories, please submit some!!!! Thanks.



Subject:         Sansom update
   Date:         Sat, 11 Oct 1997 15:41:24 -0500
   From:        "Larry & Kathryn Priest" <lwpriest@gower.net>
     To:        "Vern Toler" <vern@armory.com>

Add this to info on John Sansom and wife Jane Miller Sansom.  This info
found at the Gonzales Co., TX Courthouse.  Left by previous researchers.
Larry and Kathryn McAda Priest in north east Texas.

from Ruth  Dunlap
Information on Alexander Miller

Alexander Miller was from Ireland,  The book "The Reverend Alexander Miller
of Virginia and some of his descendants" by Milo Custer, Bloomington Ill.
June 1910" states Alexander, minister, b ca 1720 Antrim, Ireland, M Jane
Evans, b Glasgaw, Scotland.  The Rev. Miller succeeded a Mr. Hindman as
paster of Peaked Mountain and Cook's Creek congregations in Augusta Co,
Virginia in 1756.  Be graduated at Edinburg, minstered first in
Presbyterial churches in the No. of Ireland, and came to America.  In
Burks Co. PA, he made an entry of land 11-7-1746.  He was a Loyalist·  John
and Samuel Miller his sons were in the Rev. War, soldiers in Va.

     Reccords of Augusta Co. Va by Lyman Chalkley, Vol #2 page 182. - A
deed sells land patented to Alexander Miller May 14, 1787 who died
intestate by his widow and children was recorded Dec, 21 1793.  It mentions
John Miller and Jane Miller his mother, Margaret Miller, his wife ; Samuel
Miller and Anna, his wife.  Josiah Harrison and Margaret, his wife; Isaac
Miller and Polly, his wife.  Our Jane Sansom was not
mentioned and probably because she lived in Abbeville Co, So. Car.

    In the same book page 282 Augusta Co. Va Marriage Records June 6, 1786
Samuel Miller m Anna Brawford (Braford) dau of Samuel Braword (Braford).

     John Miller b County Tyrone, Ireland, 10 Jan 1749 son of Rev. Alex.
Miller and Jane (Evans) m 27 Nov 1778 Margaret Hicklin b 9 Feb 1760 dau of
Capt John Hicklin of Augusta Co., Moved to Madison Co., Ky. in 1811 this
last about John is from Milo Custer's book.

    Dorothy Cook found information in the Wm. and Mary Quarterly, Volumes
5W (2) 203, 6W (2) 59, also Virginia Historical Magazine 30V 177, 19V 112.
I have not had the oportunity to look these up as yet.  She sent me a copy
of the copy of pages from Milo Custers book but they are so poor they would
never copy again.
 
 

Information on John Sansom - You will need to send for this as I only have
a copy of copy sent to Dorothy Cook.  She had them make her a typed copy
and certified it.  The original is to poor to get a good copy,  It states:

John Sansum
State of South Carolina,  This is to certify that Jean Sansom wife of John
Sansom deceased is entitled to a grant of two hundred acreas of land
agreeable to an act of the General Assembly of the State aforesaid.  Given
under my hand this 15th April 1785.

Thomas Farrar
Lieut. J.D. Compy

I do certify that the above John Sansom deceased served as a soldier
in an Independent Company in this State untill he was captured by the enemy
and that he was kild afterwards rideing express, by the Torys.
                             Thomas Farrar



From:
        denise woleben <denisew@rainmakersystems.com>
                                                          21-Nov-99 14:46
 Subject:
        SansomSherrod genealogy
     To:
        vern@armory.com, sd1100@worldnet.att.net, Rmichelsjr@aol.com,
        trout007@flash.net, mherrin@hotmail.com, molly@jesup.net,
        marydtaylor@tyler.net, sbb_lrcb@m2.sprynet.com, KCunni1077@aol.com,
        ccc@cowtown.net, lmaBR@aol.com, gcook@utmem1.utmem.edu,
        gculbertson@mailcity.com, EWRIGHT210@aol.com, barbaramn@gnt.net
    CC:
        csherrod@gateway.net
Hello to All!

I got your names from Mr. Priest of TX -- and thought I'd let you know who
I am, what info I have on Sansoms, and what I'm looking for in this search.

I am the daughter of Sue Sherrod and Art Woleben.  Sue (lives in NewMexico)
is the daughter of Otis K. Sherrod (b. 1906 in Erath, TX) and Peggy Wright
Keating (b. in OK or AZ).

Otis K. Sherrod was one of 6 children born to Adolphus Fluornoy Sherrod (of
TX) and Maude Rivers Wilson (of OK and TX).

Adolphus ("dolph") Sherrod was the son of Manning M. Sherrod (of TX) and
Eliza Jane Sansom (of TX).

Manning Sherrod was the son of George W. Sherrod (we think he's the French
immigrant who came in via NewOrleans; he is buried in Ranger, TX......I
understand several Sansoms ended up in Ranger.....maybe someone has info on
George???) and ???

Notes:  Adolphus' mother died when Dolph was very young and Manning Sherrod
married Mary McKay of Ennis, TX or Bristol, TX.  Manning stayed very close
friends with the Sansom family.  In fact, an "Uncle Jim" (James?) Sansom
was in the 1910 census in Erath Co. Tx, living with Adolphus and Maude
Rivers Wilson and their children.  Uncle Jim was listed as being in his
50's at that time -- so his birthdate was sometime around 1860.

When Manning married Mary McKay, they had 5 boys.....and then Mary died.
Once again, the Sansoms helped to raise the boys.  There is an Uncle Billy
mentioned.  Uncle Billy would have been born sometime in the mid to late
1800s.  He may have been a brother to James. ?????????

James is buried in Box Creek (aka Pony Creek) cemetery in Erath County TX
-- He was known to have been in the Oil Lease business and was also known
to have been a "spiffy" dresser and a bachelor.

I am looking for any info on the Sherrod/Sansom connection-- where these
families lived -- how they came to Texas.....etc.

Eliza Jane's father was Radford Fluornoy Sherrod (which explains the name
Adolphus Fluornoy Sherrod) --

I also wonder if my grandfather Otis was named for the Otis in the Sansom
family.

Anyway, any info appreciated.

I have a lot of research on the Sherrod family as it grew in Erath County
Tx from Manning and his two (sequential) wives.

I am also curious -- it sounds like there was somewhat of a Scottish
migration to this area of Texas.  I know of the McAda famiy -- and now
wonder if the McKay family may indicate a trend of Scotts to settle in
Ellis County.  Anyone know of a story there?

Many thanks in advance to anyone who responds.

Denise Woleben
denisew@rainmakersystems.com



 From:
        Larry & Kathryn Priest <lwpriest@gower.net>                                                          01-Nov-99 20:24

 Subject:        Sansom auction
 

I got the following message.  Thought I would pass it on.Larry
Larry & Kathryn McAda Priest in north east Texas
Doing genealogy since 1990.
Kathryn's family in Texas Revolution, American Revolution and at Plymouth
colony from the Mayflower.
Larry's family mostly in the Witness Protection Program.
Home page is
http://www.familytreemaker.com/users/p/r/i/Larry-W-Priest/index.html
"Life is mostly attitude and timing."   From a song of Jerry Jeff Walker.
lwpriest@gower.net
 

Larry,
It's late and my brain is getting foggy - are you
researching Sansom's? If you are, you might be interested,
or know someone who is, in something that I just found.
My mother was notified that a family photo album was being
auctioned on eBay. Seems kind of unethical to me. Anyway, I
went back there and put the Sansom name in just for grins.
Some one is auctioning a postcard of the Sansom Seafood
Restaurant, Philadelphia, PA, 1936. I'll post the address
below but if it doesn't work, just go to www.ebay.com and
put Sansom in the search box.

http://cgi.ebay.com/aw-cgi/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=18969
2675

If I have you confused with someone else, just tell me! I'm
half asleep right now and am surprised that I have been able
to accomplish this much!

Later,
Laurie



http://www.tsha.utexas.edu/handbook/online/articles/view/SS/fsa28.html   From Handbook of Texas



   Date:         Sun, 17 Sep 2000 15:30:37 -0500
   From:         Larry & Kathryn Priest <LWPriest@gower.net>
    Hi, nice to hear from you.  I surely wish the photo had been ID'ed a little better.  However, T.L. is better than Blank! :-) The way we find so many. Now the possibilities are: Thomas Lackey Sansom, or his son Thomas Lowry Sansom, or Theodore Lee Sansom. We need an expert on the clothes he is wearing in the picture.  Any ideas anyone?
On another subject: John C. McAda 1769-1834. His middle name and his ancestors.
I have looked at many names in Lincoln Co., TN and come to the conclusion that the last name was McKeddy [of some form] before it was McAda.  The McKeddy's that lived on in that area are today using the name McCalla.  There are still McCalla's in that county.  I have been unsuccessful in getting anyone with that name [and posting family info] to answer my email. I recently noticed in "Wills and Inventories of Lincoln Co., TN 1810-1921 by Helen C. & Timothy R Marsh of Shelbyville, TN. that on page 34 is listed the Will of John Gragg. I believe that this should be John Cragg a much more common name. This will was witnessed by Robert McCalla and proven 11-1842.  I see John Cragg as the namesack of John C.McAda.  Craig is a very common name in the McAda faimily.  Anyone have any sources to help verify this idea?
Thanks and hello to all, Larry
Larry and Kathryn McAda Priest in northeast Texas
Doing genealogy since 1989.
Kathryn's family at Plymouth Colony, American Revolution, and Texas Revolution
Larry's family mostly in the Witness Protection Program   :-)
LWPriest@gower.net
Favorite site --- little known site to locate anything with maps
http://mapping.usgs.gov/www/gnis/gnisform.html

       -----Original Message-----
       From: R RAY <r.c.ray@worldnet.att.net>

       Subject: Re: picture of T.L. Sansom

       As regards my previous message to the effect that I thought we could rule out Theodore L. Sansom (1866-1952), I find that I        must retract that statement and put Theodore as my guess as to the picture's identity.  The picture that I remember was of        Theodore's son, Leslie Sansom.

       Theodore was a son of John Wesley and Martha Jane (McAda) Sansom.

             ----- Original Message -----
             From: Larry & Kathryn Priest

             Subject: picture of T.L. Sansom

             I have a picture only identified as T. L. Sansom.  See attachment. It was found with some pictures of a
             descendant of Andrew Bascom McAda.  Because both families were in the Gonzales Co., TX area around the
             turn of the century, I THINK this photo may be of Thomas Lackey Sansom 1818-1905.  Does anyone have
             any ideas?  Please send them to me if you know anything about this picture. Or, you may be knowledgeable
             of the period of the suit he is wearing or have some other knowledge.  Thanks. I am looking forward to any
             info.  I will forward it to everyone.  Hopefully we can get a positive identification. Thanks, Larry
 
 


Subject:         Echols history
   Date:         Mon, 14 Jan 2002 21:35:24 -0500
   From:         "Molly McLaughlin" <rufuskin@bellsouth.net>

This is Sansom family researcher Molly McLaughlin-quoted in your works on the Echols site.

About 1/3 the way down in Milner's recall, there is a statement I want to bring to your attention and explain.

"Old Thomas Wynne" begins the paragraph.  States 3rd daughter LUCINDA MD. WILLIAM GALBREATH, they have 1 daughter, md. ABSOLEM ECHOLS ROBERTS".

Absolem Echols Roberts, along with his siblings, lived and married in Walton Co., Ga.  He was one of the sons of
WILLIAM ROBERTS and his wife, FRANKIE SANSOM, a d/o JAMES SANSOM AND HIS WIFE, PATTY.

Frankie's sister, Nancy Sansom Echols, md. Absolem Echols, brother to Milner.  I believe Frankie and Nancy are sisters of
WILLIAM SANSOM who married to DELPHY CLAY SANSOM, whose line I believe the Toler line finally intersects with the Sansoms?  William and Delphy's son, WILLIAM GREENBURY SANSOM, md.
MARY SHORT.  They all went to Texas from Alabama, although WILLIAM AND DELPHY CLAY SANSOM and his sisters NANCY MD. ABSOLEM ECHOLS AND FRANKIE MD. WILLIAM ROBERTS, all were married in Greene Co., Ga. area  in the early 1806 time frame.  Frankie and William definitely are in the Greene Co., Ga. marriages.
WILLIAM ROBERTS was once guardian of THOMAS SANSOM in Clarke Co., Georgia.

The Roberts-Galbreath was:  Absolem E. Roberts to Mary W. Galbreath, 2 May 1837 (Marriage Book D, page 23).

His siblings, Willis W., Sansom W., and James T. Roberts also were married in Walton Co., Georgia.

It is said that actress Julia Roberts and her brother descend from this male Roberts gene-pool.

Molly McLaughlin



  Date:          Mon, 30 Sep 2002 13:44:29 -0400
   From:         james sansom <kudoes5453@netscape.net>

im resarching the sansom family name my family i think comes from around
Gibson and Dyer county in tn if u know  of anything bout sansoms in tn
could u please help me



Subject:         Short-Sansom
   Date:         Sun, 29 Dec 2002 15:10:08 -0600
   From:        Bill Stewart <westews@swbell.net>

    I'm just starting to research the Shorts and Sansoms in my family and so far have found them to be very interesting. I found that Reuben Pearson m. Nancy Short Feb. 13, 1814 in Clarke County, AL and that Nancy's Father was
James Short Sr. However, I haven't found who her mother was.
    I'm descended from Reuben and Nancy-their daughter, Frances Eliza m. Andrew A. Elliott in AL-
their son Hugh W. Elliott m. exana Brown in Rusk County TX-Their daughter was my grandma,
Willie Garland Elliott Stewart.
    If you can help me with the Short Sansom line I'd appreciate it very much.
Bill Stewart
Rockport, TX
westews@swbell.net
=============================================================================================
   Date:         Wed, 1 Jan 2003 13:18:30 -0500
   From:        "Archie & Carol Hendrick" <sundell@tds.net>

   I am doing some family history research for a good friend, Robert Sansom.
I believe he is a descendant of William Sansom (b: abt. 1780 in PA d: 1828),
through Willam Sansom (of PA), James Green Sansom (of PA and MO),
James Penn Sansom (of MO), Gordon J. (or James Gordon) Sansom
(of MO and IL), and Robert Lee Sansom (of MO, TX & CA).  Family members contend they are
descendants of Philadephia Sansoms -- and there are persistent stories about
a Cherokee bloodline as well.  I have lots of pieces of Sansom family
information, but have not been able to tie them all together yet.  I would
welcome any information you can provide, and look forward to introducing
Bob to a Sansom family network in the very near future!

Carol Hendrick
sundell@tds.net

===============================================================================================

Vern - thanks  so much for the information on the short-sansom tree.  No
direct connection yet to the branch I'm tracking, but I have a strong
feeling they moved through GA/TX at some point in time.  Shortly after I
emailed you, my friend Robert Sansom found the attached copy of a letter in
an old family file.  It's about the Texas Sansoms.  He has no idea where it
came from, so we don't know who to credit for it, but it was stapled to a
copy of a obituary for James Green Sansom [husband of Esther Alexona
Maxwell, son of William and Margaret (McCain) Sansom], who is most
definitely part of the Sansom family I'm researching.  It may be too long to
print in your newsletter, but I would be happy to furnish it and/or the
obituary to anyone who would like a copy.  Lula Sansom Jetton writes to her
cousin Winnie about the descendants of two brothers of English decent, whose
names are not known.  Her family history outline begins:  "Somewhere near
the year of 1780 two Sansom brothers came to the United States from England.
The given names of these two brother are not know because the family Bible
was destroyed in a fire.  On the boat coming to America they met twin Irish
girls who were coming to the United States with their parents to make their
home.  On their arrival in New York one couple moved to Alabama, and the
other to Tennessee.  To the couple who moved to Tennessee there was born two
sons -- namely, William Samuel Sansom and Dearl Flourney Sansom.  These two
brothers married Patterson sisters.  In 1836 Dearl Flourney, who was a
Methodist minister, moved with this family from Tennessee to Texas, and in
1837 William Samuel, who was also a Methodist minister, moved with his
family to Texas.  They first settled at Jasper and later moved near
Crockett."  I love the letter because it tells a story and doesn't just give
names and dates.  Here's hoping it can help someone else with their
research!

Carol Hendrick
sundell@tds.net

SANSOM FAMILY IN TEXAS

I have just received a letter from Ora, and she told me that you are once again trying to compile some data about the Sansom family tree.  She seemed to think that I know more about the relatives than she does, so she sent your request on to me.

I suppose Ora remembers when we were children that I spent more time at my Grandmother’s house listening to her talk about the relatives and the early pioneer settling of Texas.  It is just too bad that the Family Bible was destroyed in a fire after the death of my father.  The way it happened Mother and the family had to move from the parsonage into a smaller house in Hubbard after Father passed away, and for a time being they had to store so many of their things in an out house in order to have sufficient room, and Grandmother’s trunk was placed out there and the Family Bible was always kept in this trunk.  The loss of this trunk was just unfortunate because she had a complete record of the entire family that dated back for years, also ever so many pictures of the relatives.  One I especially remember was a beautiful picture of Aunt Betty Sansom, Clara’s Grandmother.

The first two Sansom men may have stayed in New York and reared their families.  Grandmother, Mary Ann Sansom, said her Father, Dearl F. Sansom, was one of the sixteen children, but just which one of the original two I never heard her say.  Only I remember her saying that her grandfather was one of the two English Sansoms.

Two of these sixteen children married sisters, and moved to Alabama and Tennessee.  Now it was Dearl Flourney Sansom and wife who moved to Tennessee and were the parents of my grandmother Mary Ann (Aunt Polly) Sansom, and your grandfather Robert P. Sansom.  In this family there were nine children, three boys and six girls.

In 1836, William Patterson Sansom, who was a son of the couple who moved to Alabama, came to Texas.  The following year his mother and father and the remainder of the family came to Texas.  Also in 1836 my grandmother,
Mary Ann Sansom, moved with her mother and father and family to Texas.  They located at Jasper, Texas, where Mary Ann met her double counsin, William Patterson Sansom, and within a few months they were married.  She was eighteen.

William Patterson Sansom, who was a Methodist minister, had found a perfect mate in Mary Ann for a preacher; for she liked to go with him on his journeys from church to church.  Which in those days were few and far between, and often the religious service was held in the homes of the early settlers.  Grandmother used to brag that she had the best horse when they had to swim a creek; high water did not keep them from their appointments.  Which no doubt shortened the life of grandfather as he was only 49 when he died.

Grandmother used to tell how she always saved bright pieces of cloth and colored glass and beads to give to the Indians when they came to her house.  As hard as tobacco and snuff was to get they tried to keep a supply on hand as Indians never forgot an act of kindness.  She said she had to be brave in those days which was very characteristic of grandmother.

Winnie, in my family line the Sansom name ends with my father, John Wesley Sansom, as neither of my three brothers have any children to carry the name on.  You will notice in this outline that I have pieced together that girls are predominate, and it was just unfortunate that so many of the Sansom men lost their lives during the Civil War.

When Elmer Sansom’s son, Flourney, lived in Hillsboro, he came to see me several times, and it certainly was a pleasure to know him.  He was another who was interested in knowing his Sansom kin.  He said, “Cousin Lou, you should see and talk with Cousin Winnie, you sure would have a good time together as I could listen to you talk always.”  I grieved when I heard of his untimely death.  I am glad that he left a little son to carry on his name.

Winnie, you can compile the records of Uncle Robert P Sansom’s children, you may know who his children married and their heirs.

I hope that the enclosed lineage will be of benefit to you.  Any questions that you think that I may be able to answer, or any way that I can be of help to you in compiling this family record just let me know.  I shall be glad to hear from you.

Affectionately, you cousin Lula Sansom Jetton

  _______________________________________________________________

Somewhere near the year of 1780 two Sansom brothers came to the United States from England.  The given names of these two brothers are not known because the family Bible was destroyed in a fire.  On the boat coming to America they met twin Irish girls who were coming to the United States with their parents to make their home.  On their arrival in New York one couple moved to Alabama, and the other to Tennessee.

To the couple who moved to Tennessee there was born two sons – namely, William Samuel Sansom and Dearl Flourney Sansom.  These two brothers married Patterson sisters.  In 1836 Dearl Flourney, who was a Methodist minister, moved with his family from Tennessee to Texas, and in 1837 William Samuel, who was also a Methodist minister, moved with his family to Texas.  They first settled at Jasper and later moved near Crockett.

The descendants of these two brothers are as follows:
 

Dearl Flourney Sansom

Robert Patterson Sansom
Radford Flourney Sansom
Franklin Marion Sansom
Mary Ann (Aunt Polly) Sansom
Sarah Sansom
Jane Sansom
Martha Sansom
Elizabeth Sansom
(There was another daughter
whose name I do not know)
William Samuel Sansom

William Patterson Sansom
Samual Dearl Sansom
Thomas Lackey Sansom
John Wesley Sansom
Sarah Sansom
(There were other daughters
whose names I do not know)
 

In these two groups of double cousins there were two who married double cousins, they were:  William Patterson Sansom married Mary Ann (Aunt Polly) Sansom, and John Wesley Sansom married Jane Sansom.  Robert Patterson Sansom married Susan Manning.  Franklin Marion Sansom’s third wife was named Betty Whealer.  I don’t have a record of whom the other brothers and sisters in these two groups married.  The descendants of the above marriages are as follows:

William Patterson Sansom and Mary Ann Sansom
(William Patterson Sansom was a Methodist Minister, and belonged to the East Texas Conference for eleven years before he passed away in 1859.)
 

William Sansom
Franklin Sansom
Jane Sansom
Sarah Sansom
Martha Sansom
Elizabeth Sansom
Mary Sansom
John Wesley Sansom
Jimmie Sansom (girl)
 

John Wesley Sansom married Georgia V. Thomas
(John Wesley Sansom was a Methodist Minister for twenty-eight years, serving in the Northwest and Central Texas Confernence.  He passed away in May 1809, at the age of 49, while he was pastor of the Methodist Church at Hubbard, Texas.)
 

Ora Lee Sansom
Dissouri V. Sansom (Zue)
Mary Louisa Sansom (Lula)
Josephine Sansom (Joe-deceased)
Bertha Marvin Sansom (Bertie – deceased)
William Thomas Sansom (Bill)
John McFerrin Sansom (Jack)
Wesley Wyatt Sansom

Ora Lee Sansom married James Mathew Bettis

Lottie Louise Bettis, Clifton, Texas

Dissouri V. Sansom married Thomas Franklin McGuffey, Hubbard, Texas
 

Manley McGuffey, Athens, Texas
Tom McGuffey, Hubbard, Texas
Paul McGuffey, Waco, Texas
John Wesley McGuffey, Athens, Texas
Marvin McGuffey, deceased
Raymond McGuffey, deceased
Edwin Sansom McGuffey, Hubbard, Texas
Joe Blackney McGuffey, Hubbard, Texas

Manley Mc Guffey has two sons:  Manley Jr., and George Thomas.  Manley Jr. has one son.  John Wesley McGuffey has three sons; Wesley Jr., Robert and Fred.  Joe Blackney McGuffey has one son named Paul.

Mary Louisa Sansom married Henry Maben Jetton, Mertens, Texas
 

James Henry Jetton
Georgia Winifred Jetton (Winnie)
Clemmie Josephine Jetton (Clem)
Thelma Sansom Jetton

James Henry Jetton has one son named James Glenn.  They live in Dallas, Texas.  Georgia Winifred Jetton married Sam Doyle Danaway, Italy, Texas.  They have one daughter, Winnie La Trelle.

Clemmie Josephine married Halbert Wesley Keathley, Corsicana, Texas.  They have one son, Frank Maben Keathley, who is married and has one son named Frank Maben Jr.  Thelma Sansom Jetton married Robert Dudley Patterson of Brandon, Texas – now living in Corsicana.

I do not have a record of the decendants of John Wesley Sansom and Jane Sansom.

Robert Patterson Sansom and Susan Manning
 

Marion Sansom
Dearl Flourney Sansom
Bryon Manning Sansom
William Sansom
Susan Sansom
 

By his second wife, Engenia:  Lola Sansom

By his third wife, Octavia Carlo:  Robert Sansom, Marvin Sansom

Franklin Marion Sansom and second wife

Jenny Sansom

By his third wife, Betty Whealer:  Frank Marshall Sansom, Otis Sansom (died when 15 yrs old), Leon Sansom, Guy Sansom (died when 4 yrs old)

Of the decendants of William Patterson Sansom and Mary Ann Sansom, two of the sons, William and Franklin were killed in the Civil War, and during that time four of the daughters – Sarah, Martha, Elizabeth and Mary – died within two weeks time of typhoid pneumonia.

Jane Sansom married a Mr. Hallmark
George Patterson Hallmark

Jimmie Sansom married Jim Binyon

Molly Binyon

Molly Binyon married Priestly Limscomb and they had one daughter, Pauline Lipscomb.  At present she and her father are living in Denton, Texas.

Josephine Sansom married George Truly, Hubbard, Texas

Ora Mae Truly – married Ivan Dobson, Dallas, Texas.
Allene Truly – married Hill Windham, Italy, Texas.  Two children:  Roy Mitichell and Helen Joe Windham.  Allene passed away in 1938.
Roy Sansom Truly – one daughter, Joan Truly, Dallas, Texas.

The only trace that I have of the Sansoms who remained in Alabama is through M.M. Johnson, 903 Thomason Drive, Dallas, Texas, whose mother was Emma Sansom of Alabama.  Emma Sansom was a Civil War heroine.  There is one chapter devoted to her bravery in the book of General Forrester’s Life.  I remember my grandmother saying that Emma Sansom of Alabama was a niece of her husband.

There is a group of Sansoms living in Georgetown, whose father was Judge Cooper Sansom, however, I think he has passed away within the last few years.
 
 

  __________________________________________________________________________
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 





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